Beyond Ballet Russes

22 Mar 2012 – 1 Apr 2012

Performances

London Coliseum

22 Mar 2012 – 1 Apr 2012

PROGRAMME 1

L’Après-midi d’un faune
A faun lazing on a rock sees seven nymphs about to bathe. He startles them and all but one flee from him. After a brief period the Chief Nymph, too, eludes his grasp and the faun is left with her discarded veil which he caresses in an arousing manner. The stylised
choreography draws on tableau from ancient Greek Attic vase painting with the dancers moving across the stage in profile.

Faun(e)
David Dawson’s version of Faun(e), based on Nijinsky’s L’Après-midi d’un faune.With Dawson’s sensitive inventiveness Faun(e) is his kinetic response to Debussy’s score that suggests an abstract narrative with a focus on the essence of dance.

World Premiere
Firebird
The invisible Firebird has power beyond imagination. She represents the world around us, nature in its purest form. It is only when people intervene in her world to see how she can enhance their lives that they see her true force. It is human nature that manipulates and deforms her and it is
human nature that brings her back from the abyss. This interpretation of the Firebird focuses on the present day as well as the future – with the world pushing its resources and environment to the limit, humans, in their attempt to become the all powerful dominant force, think
they can control nature herself. Our story highlights these issues and represents the potential for structural change and equality.

The Rite of Spring
The adoration of the earth A tribe of young men and women are celebrating the arrival of Spring. At first the dance is gentle but it becomes wilder and more frantic. There is a stunned silence, then an even more frenzied dance begins, followed by a procession in which the dancers appear
almost hypnotised. 

The sacrifice
Six maidens dance for the tribe, which watches them intently. One will be chosen as a sacrifice to the earth. The elders come forward and indicate the Chosen One. She stands alone, and the tribe gathers around her and dances in ever more brutal excitement. The Chosen One’s dancing grows more and more violent until the Chosen One falls exhausted. She is thrown above the heads of the tribe members and her lifeless body is caught in triumph. The rite is over.

PROGRAMME 2

Apollo
The young Apollo is joined on Mount Olympus, the home of the gods, by three of the muses and he gives each an emblem of her respective art. Calliope, representing poetry and eloquence, receives a tablet on which to write; Polyhymnia, representing
mime, a mask; and Terpsichore, the muse of dance, a lyre. Each muse demonstrates her individual art, but only Terpsichore pleases Apollo and returns to dance with him. Throughout the ballet the god matures in skill and understanding and, at the end, is seen leading the muses to their home on Parnassus.

Le beau gosse (Handsome Young Chap) from Le Train bleu
This solo, from the sporting ballet created for the 1924 Paris Olympics by Bronislava Nijinska (Nijinsky’s sister), was choreographed to show off the acrobatic prowess of Anton Dolin, who would later be one of the founders of English National Ballet.

World Premiere
Jeux
Jeux sets the scene of a choreographer working in the rehearsal studio to create a new original work for the stage. The piece encompasses all those emotions experienced within the studio and the ultimate relationship between the choreographer and his muses.

Suite en blanc
This one-act ballet choreographed by the legendary Serge Lifar is internationally acclaimed as a neoclassical showpiece. Set to Edouard Lalo’s Suite from Namouna, it is one of Lifar’s rare plotless ballets, designed to display the elegance and virtuosity of its dancers.

L’Après-midi d’un faune
Choreography Vaslav Nijinsky
Music Claude Debussy
Set and Costume Design Léon Bakst
Lighting John B. Read

Revived from his dance notation score by Ann Hutchinson Guest and Claudia Jeschke.

Faun(e)
Choreography David Dawson
Music Claude Debussy
Costume Design Yumiko Takeshima
Design and Lighting David Dawson

Firebird
Choreography George Williamson
Music Igor Stravinsky
Set Design David Bamber and George Williamson in collaboration with John Campbell Scenic Studio
Costume Design David Bamber
Lighting Nicholas Holdridge

By arrangement with Schott Music Limited and Chester Music Ltd

The Rite of Spring
Choreography Kenneth MacMillan
Music Igor Stravinsky
Design Kinder Aggugini
Lighting John B. Read
Re-staging Yuri Uchiumi

Le Train bleu
Choreography Bronislava Nijinska
Music Darius Milhaud
Original Costume Design Coco Chanel

Given by permission of EDITIONS HEUGEL & CIE, PARIS/ UNITEDMUSIC PUBLISHERS LTD, LONDON

Jeux
Choreography Wayne Eagling inspired in part by Vaslav Nijinsky’s original concept, and some of Kenneth MacMillan’s work on the Herbert Ross film Nijinsky
Music Claude Debussy
Costume Design Wizzy Shawyer
Lighting David Richardson

Apollo
Choreography George Balanchine
Music Igor Stravinsky
Lighting David Mohr
Staging Nanette Glushak

These performances of Apollo, a Balanchine ® Ballet are presented by arrangement with the George Balanchine Trust and have been produced in accordance with the Balanchine Style ® and Balanchine Technique ® Service standards established and provided by the Trust.

Suite en blanc
Choreography Serge Lifar
Musical arrangements Serge Lifar
Music Edouard Lalo
Staging Maina Gielgud

Presented by arrangement with Josef Weinberger Limited on behalf of Editions Mario Bois, Paris

Performances of The Rite of Spring and Apollo are given by permission of Boosey & Hawkes Music Publishers Ltd

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